Posts Tagged ‘social media

20
Sep
08

Jarek Beem compares Connect 07 and Connect 08

20
Sep
08

A Perspective on eHealth

Mia Lustria talked about Research Perspectives in Consumer Health Informatics & Measurement Issues.

Consumer health informatics or eHealth: Help others make more informed health decisions

Using social media in healthcare – Examples of Consumer Health Informatics Applications:

Shift in emphasis in online searching from disease and treatment to wellness and prevention.  Eighty percent of Americans have searched online for health information.

Why use social media for health? 

  • Messages can be personalized
  • Reach a broad audience
  • Interactivity
  • Control the timing
  • Message can be tailored to narrowly-defined audiences

Example of tailoring to a specific audience online: Re-mission: Game and community for young people with cancer

Online Healthcare Challenges:

  • Access issues
  • Linking design and theory
  • Maximizing interactivity and tailoring capabilities
  • Finding ways to measure

Great presentation.  Hopefully we will be able to get her slide show and post them up later on this site. Thanks!

20
Sep
08

interview with kami huyse

20
Sep
08

Interview with Lionel Menchaca

Addition: here’s Michael Wesch’s YouTube page.

20
Sep
08

Ethics in the Wild, Wild West (AKA social media)

After Kami Huyse discussed relationship building, Dr. Kaye Sweetser presented the findings from her pilot study on the impact of ethics on relationships.

She quoted some previous literature in organizational use of social media.  One study was by Kelleher and Miller (2006) about  relational strategies through organization blogs.  Kelleher and Miller found that organization blogs more conversational and used a human voice.  Another study she did with Emily Metzgar where they exposed participants to an organization blog and personal blog in a crisis situation.  Their findings revealed that the organization blog was able to defuse a crisis situation.

The study employed an experimental design with two groups exposed to YouTube video series on a campaign featuring BMW cars called Rampenfest.  The manipulation dealt with ethical behavior.  One of the groups were told that BMW was honest about their involvement with the campaign, designated as the truth treatment.  The second group was told that BMW lied about their involvement with the campaign, referred to as the lie treatment.  There was also a control group.

The 80 participants were mostly female with an average age of 21.  On the relationship scale or the “big honkin’ score for relationships,” the range was from 12-60, with the larger the number indicating a higher level of perceived credibility.  The control group had the highest credibility score, followed by the truth group with the lie treatment group significantly lower than the other two.  Basically, lying damaged BMW’s relationships.

There is evidence that mere exposure decreases credibility for an organization.  This pilot study allowed for a better understanding of interconnectedness of ethics and relationships.  A crucial item to learn from the results is that an organization must act ethically in social media campaign.  However, Dr. Sweetser emphasized that new media tactics should be treated as tools, just like other PR endeavors.

Dr. Sweetser said the takeaway message is that organizations must behave ethically, no matter what format they use to communicate their messages.  Don’t risk a good relationship!

Other links associated with her presentations can be found at: http://www.kayesweetser.com/archives/129

20
Sep
08

Kami Huyse on Relationship Building

The third session began with Kami Huyse, principal of the PR virtual agency MyPRPro, speaking on relationship building.  

Huyse spoke about how social media may actually facilitate true two-way communication in the practice of public relations.  

She talked about a popular topic at the conference this year, communities, and how they differ from publics.  While a public comes together for a certain purpose and may break apart after that purpose, a community comes together for a certain purpose and usually sustains.  

The three main steps Huyse emphasized were to listen, participate, and contribute.  You should start by reading blogs, following blogrolls, and seeing how people are connected in a community.  Next, you can participate by posting comments on a blog or communicating through Twitter.  Finally, you should contribute bringing your organization into the community. Through these steps, you can blend the interests of the organization with the interests of the community.  

The main reason communities are important is because it is impossible for an organization to build one-on-one relationships with every customer, therefore it should strive to build a relationship with the community as a whole.  

Great discussion, thanks Kami! Next up will be Dr. Kaye Sweetser also speaking on relationship building.

20
Sep
08

Interview with Keynote Speaker, Peter Himler

20
Sep
08

More Facebook tips from Dr. V

Many college students remember Facebook’s earliest days, where the community was exclusive to college students (and they liked it that way, thank-u-very-much) and unadulterated by advertisers. Today, many corporations view the social networking site as a wealth of customers, conveniently separated into interest groups, that they are desperate to tap into.

Indeed, many companies have tried to engage the 100+ million Facebook users through ineffective (often gimmicky) paid ads, Facebook applications, “Fan” pages and more. Since Facebook PR is still in the experimental stages, what works so far and what doesn’t? Dr. Mihaela Vorvoreanu (I will now refer to her as “Dr. V”) offered us several tips:

  • Since Facebook has more than 100 million users and 55,000 networks, companies need to identify the subcultures and publics on the site with common traits.
  • Most Facebook users will not use Facebook as a way to communicate with a company, and will not seek out a brand on Facebook. They will only engage with the organization on Facebook if it is one they feel strongly about (example: I love musician Pete Yorn, so I joined a PY group on Facebook).
  • Corporations should avoid “Trying 2 Hard 2 B Kool,” and carefully consider whether their presence on Facebook will be useful/ appropriate.
  • When considering whether your company/ client will “fit in” to the Facebook community, ask yourself if there is anything you can do to help with relationship maintenance, self-presentation or impression management. If so, Facebook PR might be worth a shot!

On a lighter note, Dr. V also offered a link to answer the age-old question: What the heck does “Poking” mean!?

20
Sep
08

Public Relations on Facebook

The second session began with Mihaela Vorvoreanu, a professor from Clemson University, speaking on how to use Facebook and the public’s perspective of it. 

The topic focused on how Facebook is not about the technology, it’s about the culture.

When a company is thinking about joining Facebook, you have to have a planning period. You should practice using the technology, listen to the conversation, and talk to your audience before diving in.  You want to focus on a long-term relationship, so take your time.

It’s all about relationship management and self-presentation.

During Vorvoreanu’s research on students, she found that they would be interested in good deals or discounts that are relevant to them and exclusive to Facebook. It’s about making a unique reason for people to visit your company on this medium rather than their main Web site.

So does your organization fit in?  Do the research and find your audience.  There is room on Facebook for your company, as long as you do it right.

Thank you Mihaela!

20
Sep
08

Public Relations: What has and hasn’t changed

Peter Himler was our keynote speaker at the Connect dinner last tonight at the Foundry Park Inn.  He talked about his thoughts on Public Relations explaining that many are using social media but there is still a need for using the PR basics as well as traditional media.  Some of the points he made are:

  • The challenge with mainstream media is it’s so fragmented, but companies still want it.  That is how they measure results.
  • Public Relations is still measured by the amount of print and air time we get.
  • Clients must be online so that they are searchable.
  • We are in a kind of “ying yang situation” according to Himler. We are trying to move forward with social media but are getting pulled back with the continued need for traditional PR.

Himler also stated that Public Relations has a great future because practitioners don’t have to filter through journalists anymore.  They can finally speak directly to the audience and create a more authentic message. 

Many examples were given on how companies are listening to online conversations.  One company was Comcast.  They responded to a customer who was complaining on Twitter about how Comcast kept not showing up for their appointment.  Nice job Comcast!

Once the bad pitching topic came up, Himler had his opinion on the important things to remember when creating a pitch: Keep pitches short, sweet, relevant and CONVERSATIONAL.

Himler really feels like Public Relations touches all media and everything we do. This is why he focuses his blog, The Flack, on that topic.  Thanks for speaking Peter!




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